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Cover Image: Masthead of Ke Au Okoa published on September 25, 1865.

Aloha Nūhou Monday!

Advertisements, though most times tiny and insignificant looking, can add to our understanding of history.

Photographer Henry L. Chase was a passenger on the Ceylon from Boston, arriving in Honolulu in 1856. But he started his career in Hawaiʻi when he opened shop in Honolulu in 1862, where he remained until 1888. He then moved to Wailuku, Maui where he continued his occupation until his death in 1901. It is interesting that in the beginning he was called “Alualu,” by Hawaiians, which literally means to chase. But in the later ad we see him referred to as “Keiki,” which is a Hawaiianized pronunciation of Chase.

Image: “H. L. Chase,” Ka Nupepa Kuokoa, June 14, 1862, p. 3.

H. L. Chase

Photographer

The Photography Studio of J. W. King has been purchased by H. L. Chase (Alualu). He is prepared to deftly take photographs of everyone who desires. Come down to see; his studio is above the

Printing Office of the “Kuokoa,”

To the east side of the

Post Office

(Kuokoa, 10/31/1868, p. 3) 

Image: “Hale Pai Kii,” Ke Au Okoa, September 25, 1865, p. 4.

PHOTO STUDIO.

My photo studio is in the building next to the Post Offie, above the Printing Office of the “Nupepa Kuokoa.” The photographs are very reasonable. The cost of taking a photo is very affordable.

(Au Okoa, 9/25/1865, p. 4)

Image: Bernice Pauahi Bishop’s pet dogs, Toby and Figaro; Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, 1875. Photo by H. L. Chase, Bishop Museum Archives. SP 210728.

Image sharing on social media is welcome. For all other uses please contact Archives@BishopMuseum.org

Image: Honolulu Harbor; Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, ca. 1860. Photo by H. L. Chase, Bishop Museum Archives. SP 31463.

Image sharing on social media is welcome. For all other uses please contact Archives@BishopMuseum.org

Image: The McKee & Anthon Building on Queen Street from Kaʻahumanu Street; Honolulu, Hawaiʻi, ca. 1868. Photo by H. L. Chase, Bishop Museum Archives. SP 31473.

Image sharing on social media is welcome. For all other uses please contact Archives@BishopMuseum.org

This post is part of He Aupuni Palapala: Preserving and Digitizing the Hawaiian Language Newspapers, a partnership between Bishop Museum and Awaiaulu with assistance from Kamehameha Schools. Mahalo nui loa to Hawaii Tourism Authority for their support. Learn more about this project here.

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